Language notes /// On Fëanor.

The matter of Elvish names is one of the most interesting ones in Tolkien’s Legendarium. The way of Elves’ giving names to their children presents a very thought-out system showing the depth of Elvish culture, the importance of family values to them and their skill in giving the names that capture the inner nature of a person. Let’s have a look at the story of Fëanor’s name and how it reflects his personality.

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A curious incident of interdental consonants.

Languages are prone to changes. Influenced by many factors, they never stay the same but always evolve at all levels. J. R. R. Tolkien was well-known for creating his own languages which became more than just different words in his works. His invented languages actually worked within Arda and turned into one of the most important elements of the narrative.

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Good guys gone bad.

In Tolkien’s Middle-earth Elves are traditionally presented and perceived as noble, wise and overall positive characters. However, as all normal creatures, the eldest Children of Ilúvatar have their flaws, while some of them are flat out villains. In the present essay I will look at several bad guys from The Silmarillion and see how they brought trouble to others’ lives.

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Fëanor and Melkor: so different, so alike.

When we talk about the cruelest villain in the whole Middle-earth – Melkor (or rather Morgoth) that is – we might be inclined to think that he is one of a kind in the whole of Ёa. However, if you take a closer look, it’s not exactly so. Melkor is indeed a mighty evil spirit that virtually no one can rival, but a lot of his traces can be surprisingly seen in the eldest son of Finwё and the greatest of the Noldor – in Fëanor. A careful look will reveal that these two have more in common than seems at first sight.

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