How to insult a spider.

J. R. R. Tolkien was a great lover of words. It showed both — in his extensive vocabulary and talent to choose words with great precision to make his texts come alive with various shades of lexical meanings. One of the most special traits of Tolkien’s writing was a mastery usage of archaic style. A particularly interesting example of obsolete vocabulary can be found in The Hobbit.

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Elvish poetry in The Hobbit.

In my essay dedicated to poetry in Tolkien’s books I have spoken about the importance of verse in Arda. Spanning a significant period in the Third Age, The Hobbit is no exception, and its many poems and songs scattered all over the book are very representative of the peoples who sing them. In the present essay I will look into the Elvish poetry in The Hobbit and see what it tells us about the fair folk.

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In the shadows of dark forests.

Forests have long been significant in literature. Dark, enchanted, haunted woods carry a special meaning and signify an important stage in any journey. They both – add up to the atmosphere of a story by making striking landscape features, and can help us understand characters and their doings better. Read more