It is all in the mind.

When in the heat of his grief over the murder of his father and the theft of the Silmarilli Fëanor accused the Valar of being idle and taking no steps to punish Morgoth and return the gems, little did the Elf know how much he erred. Even sitting in silence in that dark moment, the Powers were far from being inactive.

Read more

«Alone of the Valar he knew fear»

for though his might was greatest

of all things in this world,

alone of the Valar he knew fear.

(Silmarillion, p.178)

Quite often throughout The Silmarillion we can read of Morgoth’s being afraid at those especially tense moments when his safety was in peril. While fear is a common reaction in mortals as a means of self-preservation, it does not seem to be a very typical emotion for immortal divine beings, even in their physical forms. Morgoth was the only exception: he could feel fear. But how come the mightiest of the Ainur was frightened of anything at all? Read more

Marriage divine.

The Valar – the Powers of the World – were the Ainur that descended into Arda upon its coming into being. They were so enamoured of the beauty of the world that wished to abide there and prepare the place for the Children of Ilúvatar. While some of the Valar dwelt alone, most of them were in spousal relationship.  Read more

Sea the majestic (Part II).

Being places to traverse rather than to inhabit, seas separate continents and nations. They serve as a natural border and by dividing lands they also do so with cultures: traditions and customs may vary significantly on different coasts of one and the same sea. In the past travelling overseas was a thing necessary for the exchange of cultures and traditions, enriching a people’s background and, eventually, contributing to their evolution. Read more